via smallntender:

The imagination of Simon Prades. Prades lives and works in Saarbrücken, Germany and teaches illustration at the university of applied sciences in Trier. You can find more of his work over on Behance. If you liked this also check out the work of Pat Perry.
Via Colossal

Caribbean Corals.

Giant anemone, star coral, and sea fans.

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Photographer: Noel Lopez Fernandez. See more photos from this shoot. 

Via Saray Dugas / Pinterest 

scinerds:

Phyllodes Imperialis Caterpillar

Also known as Oruga Cabeza Grande (Big Headed Caterpillar)

Image Credits: © Lui Weber/ Rex Features / plant.nerd

Looking like a cross between a skull and Squidward from Spongebob is the caterpillar of the Pink Underwing Moth (Phyllodes imperialis).

This bizarre creature is found below the altitude of 600m in undisturbed, subtropical rain forest, and survives entirely on the vine Carronia multisepalea, a collapsed shrub that provides the food and habitat the moth requires in order to breed. Due to habitat destruction and tourist disturbance, the moth is listed as nationally endangered in Australia. — (via thefeaturedcreature)

Its face looks as if it was adorned by the ‘Dia De Los Muertos’ theme, how very cool :)

Rhino Beetles by Tiffany Bozic

via http://www.tiffanybozic.net/ 

jtotheizzoe:

Frost Flowers Blooming in the Arctic Ocean are Found to be Teeming with Life

These snowflake-like crystals grow from tiny imperfections in floating sea ice, the super-frigid air causing water vapor to crystallize right out of the air into the stunning ordered shapes you see. 

These “frost flowers” have been found to harbor microbial life, far more than the sea around them, creating tiny ecosystems like forzen coral. Life does find a way, huh?

Read more about the research of these “frost flower” microbial communities here.

(via Colossal)

There are more than 3,000 described species of nudibranchs. The club shaped structures on their heads (called rhinophores) are used to sense and taste. 

via fuckyeahbranchs. Dorid on red carpet by EunJae Underwater Photography on Flickr.

There are more than 3,000 described species of nudibranchs. The club shaped structures on their heads (called rhinophores) are used to sense and taste. 

via fuckyeahbranchsDorid on red carpet by EunJae Underwater Photography on Flickr.

Washington State Plans for a More Acidic Ocean

sciencecenter:

Meet Etheostoma obama, a new species of fish named after the president

The researchers named the five newly discovered species of the darter – the smallest member of the perch family – after four presidents and one vice-president. All but one are Democrats, like Obama.
The darter, which packs a lot of colour into its fairly diminutive dimensions – males are mostly under 50mm in length – spends its life in the fast-moving freshwater rivers and creeks that are the veins of America.
It gets it name from its ability to get around rocks and other obstacles on the bottom of waterways. Most darters live in the creeks of northern Alabama and eastern Tennessee, not typically hospitable terrain for Democrats.

sciencecenter:

Meet Etheostoma obama, a new species of fish named after the president

The researchers named the five newly discovered species of the darter – the smallest member of the perch family – after four presidents and one vice-president. All but one are Democrats, like Obama.

The darter, which packs a lot of colour into its fairly diminutive dimensions – males are mostly under 50mm in length – spends its life in the fast-moving freshwater rivers and creeks that are the veins of America.

It gets it name from its ability to get around rocks and other obstacles on the bottom of waterways. Most darters live in the creeks of northern Alabama and eastern Tennessee, not typically hospitable terrain for Democrats.

I love this illustration, especially the little diver in the corner. 

Diatoms

There are more than 200 genera of living diatoms, and it is estimated that there are approximately 100,000 extant speciesDiatoms are a widespread group and can be found in the oceans, in freshwater, in soils and on damp surfaces. Most live pelagically in open water, although some live as surface films at the water-sediment interface (benthic), or even under damp atmospheric conditions. They are especially important in oceans, where they are estimated to contribute up to 45% of the total oceanic primary production.

- Wikipedia

(photo via Phytoplankton key - Phycokey - Microscopic Art images)

sugaratoms:

Parrotfish Scales

Photograph by Tim Laman, National Geographic

Snapped off the coast of Borneo, these iridescent green scales armor a parrotfish (Scarus sp.). The evolutionary link between feathers and scales is evident on developing bird embryos, which are scattered with disks of cells called placodes. Some of these cells grow into scales, such as the ones that cover a chicken’s legs, while others turn into feathers.

biocanvas:

The proboscis of a moth at 10-times magnification.
Image by Didier Grunwald.

biocanvas:

The proboscis of a moth at 10-times magnification.

Image by Didier Grunwald.

Extinction is forever

nrdc:

“An analysis by the U.S. Geological Service reveals that, between 1989 and 2006, 57 fish species went extinct in North America – a pace that is 877 times the previous, background rate of extinction.”

- Barry Nelson, NRDC senior policy analyst. Read more: Water Woes - A New Report about Endangered Species and Water

Posted on November 14, 2012

Reblogged from: NRDC

Notes: 59 notes

Orchids are some of my favorite of all flowers. They are so incredibly adapted to their pollinators. 

heaveninawildflower:

Catasetum and Cypripedium from ‘News of spring and other nature studies’ 1917 by Edward Julius Detmold (1883 — 1957).

http://poulwebb.blogspot.com/2012/03/edward-detmold-illustrator-part-2.html

Wikimedia.

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